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teganandsara:

Nations Twins Day.

teganandsara:

Nations Twins Day.

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fusrodrawblog:

About 95% done! Just need to add water, fish, and the flag on the small castle :)

fusrodrawblog:

About 95% done! Just need to add water, fish, and the flag on the small castle :)

(via etelephone)

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habituallydestructive:

*laughs while actually getting feelings hurt*

(via cannibalsinpanties)

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askinnyblackman:

things i used to laugh at

  • actual jokes

things i laugh at now

  • yard sard

(via seemeeimbeebee)

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bident:

william shakespeare wrote a black italian lead but ofc there cant be any poc in frozen its in europe

(via seemeeimbeebee)

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messinthedress:

mihrstears:

send this to your crush. just. just do it

He’s back.

(Source: weloveshortvideos.com)

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mangomamita:

u just gotta hav ur hand on ur boob sometimes

(via cannibalsinpanties)

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TED Talk

can we talk about suheir hammad or?????

Photoset

We become who we are meant to be.

(via mens-rights-activia)

Photoset

pineplapple:

This is hands down the best parody twitter ever

(via threepipeproblems)

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medievalpoc:

Medievalpoc Presents: History of POC in Math and Science Week, 8-3-14 through 8-9-14!

Medievalpoc’s first Patreon Milestone Goal has been reached, and the History of POC in Math and Science Week is happening soon! This all-new themed week will focus on the contribution of people of color to the fields of mathematics, science, physics, medicine, natural philosophy, and much, much more!

There will be a focus on primary documents with interactive elements, visual and documentary evidence, innovators and their biographies, and notable personages of color from the Islamic Golden Age, Medieval Europe, African Empires and Universities, Asian images and texts, and discussion about early modern globalization regarding how this knowledge traveled.

If you have an article, image, document, or commentary you would like to submit, here’s your chance to weigh in on this topic! Please use the “Math and Science Week” and any other relevant tags for your submission, and I look forward to hearing about your favorite mathematicians and scientists of color!

(via medievalpoc)

Quote
"For art to be unpolitical means only for it to ally itself with the ruling group."

— Bertold Brecht, “A Short Organum for the Theatre” (via megamissingno)

(Source: heteroglossia, via thefreshprinceof-denmark)

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nprfreshair:

Last year, Rukmini Callimachi found thousands of al-Qaida documents in Timbuktu in northern Mali when she was the West Africa bureau chief for the Associated Press.
Al-Qaida left behind the pages just after a French-led military intervention drove the jihadi fighters out of the area, where they had imposed a harsh version of Islamic law. The documents include directives and letters from al-Qaida commanders.
In the interview, Callimachi tells Terry Gross about al-Qaida’s highly detailed record-keeping:

"When I came back with these receipts, and we started translating them, these thousands and thousands of receipts for things like onions and a kilo of tomatoes and a receipt for a 60-cent piece of cake that somebody ate — it made us laugh. And I guess it made us laugh because we assumed that terrorists are these bad guys with guns — and violent, et cetera — and we have assumed that’s divorced from these bureaucratic procedures that we see at play here.
In fact, people that have covered al-Qaida and studied the group longer than me, say they’ve found the exact same thing in Afghanistan. It’s partly the DNA of Osama bin Laden, who started out life as a businessman. He was the son of a very wealthy entrepreneur, and he started out as a young man trying to run his own companies. … Even when he ran his own companies, he was obsessed with bureaucracy. People that worked for him in Sidon [in Lebanon] remember having to turn in triplicate receipts with carbon copies for things like replacing bicycle tires or car tires.”

Photo: A road sign written by Islamist rebels is seen at the entrance into Timbuktu January 31, 2013. File photo Image by: BENOIT TESSIER / REUTERS
Sign says, “Timbuktu is founded on Islam and will be judged by Islamic Laws (Charia)”

nprfreshair:

Last year, Rukmini Callimachi found thousands of al-Qaida documents in Timbuktu in northern Mali when she was the West Africa bureau chief for the Associated Press.

Al-Qaida left behind the pages just after a French-led military intervention drove the jihadi fighters out of the area, where they had imposed a harsh version of Islamic law. The documents include directives and letters from al-Qaida commanders.

In the interview, Callimachi tells Terry Gross about al-Qaida’s highly detailed record-keeping:

"When I came back with these receipts, and we started translating them, these thousands and thousands of receipts for things like onions and a kilo of tomatoes and a receipt for a 60-cent piece of cake that somebody ate — it made us laugh. And I guess it made us laugh because we assumed that terrorists are these bad guys with guns — and violent, et cetera — and we have assumed that’s divorced from these bureaucratic procedures that we see at play here.

In fact, people that have covered al-Qaida and studied the group longer than me, say they’ve found the exact same thing in Afghanistan. It’s partly the DNA of Osama bin Laden, who started out life as a businessman. He was the son of a very wealthy entrepreneur, and he started out as a young man trying to run his own companies. … Even when he ran his own companies, he was obsessed with bureaucracy. People that worked for him in Sidon [in Lebanon] remember having to turn in triplicate receipts with carbon copies for things like replacing bicycle tires or car tires.”

Photo: A road sign written by Islamist rebels is seen at the entrance into Timbuktu January 31, 2013. File photo
Image by: BENOIT TESSIER / REUTERS

Sign says, “Timbuktu is founded on Islam and will be judged by Islamic Laws (Charia)”

Audio

susiethemoderator:

Nicki Minaj’s featured verse in ‘Monster’ is better than all of the songs on Iggy Azalea’s wannabe rap discography.

(Source: dramaticaltunes, via sayangnasayang)

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nprfreshair:

Tonight on the Sundance cable network, Maggie Gyllenhaal stars in a new eight-part miniseries that couldn’t be more timely: It’s about a woman who finds herself embroiled in the political tensions of the Middle East, and the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. Our TV critic, David Bianculli, has this review of The Honorable Woman:

"Writer-director Hugo Blick peels back and reveals the elements of his story, and the motivations and relationships of his characters, very slowly. A scream you hear in episode one isn’t explained until episode four, and the pain behind anguished glances isn’t evident until you’ve clocked hours of TV time. But by that time, The Honorable Woman has taken you places where TV seldom ventures. Not only to the tunnels under the Gaza Strip – and I couldn’t believe I was seeing scenes set in those tunnels, after they’ve figured so prominently in the news – but to the deepest fears and hopes and dreams and despairs of the show’s characters. Politically, The Honorable Woman doesn’t take sides – it comes at you from all sides. And all sides are given motivations and conflicts, which makes this miniseries both a rare and a rewarding viewing experience. The characters in The Honorable Woman may not know whom to trust – but trust me. This is one TV drama not to miss.”

nprfreshair:

Tonight on the Sundance cable network, Maggie Gyllenhaal stars in a new eight-part miniseries that couldn’t be more timely: It’s about a woman who finds herself embroiled in the political tensions of the Middle East, and the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. Our TV critic, David Bianculli, has this review of The Honorable Woman:

"Writer-director Hugo Blick peels back and reveals the elements of his story, and the motivations and relationships of his characters, very slowly. A scream you hear in episode one isn’t explained until episode four, and the pain behind anguished glances isn’t evident until you’ve clocked hours of TV time. But by that time, The Honorable Woman has taken you places where TV seldom ventures. Not only to the tunnels under the Gaza Strip – and I couldn’t believe I was seeing scenes set in those tunnels, after they’ve figured so prominently in the news – but to the deepest fears and hopes and dreams and despairs of the show’s characters. Politically, The Honorable Woman doesn’t take sides – it comes at you from all sides. And all sides are given motivations and conflicts, which makes this miniseries both a rare and a rewarding viewing experience. The characters in The Honorable Woman may not know whom to trust – but trust me. This is one TV drama not to miss.”

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